Imaginary Buildings in Invisible Cities perhaps?

In the Current Issue of The Idiom Magazine Matthew Antonio has a poem called Imaginary Buildings 2…He had a few other Imaginary Building poems and other numbered poems in a series titled He….unfortunately they were published in other places so I grabbed #2 before I could lose it.

I love these types of poems and if you know my (Mark Brunetti) poetry you know that I have a small collection of poems I have dubbed ‘museum’ poems.  My obsession with museum poems began with Carolyn Forche’s poem The Museum of Stones.   I was given a workshop prompt and wrote The Museum of Dogs which won me the William Paterson Poetry prize and eventually became the title for my collection of poems for my thesis project.

….but back to Matthew’s poem…..Imaginary Buildings remind me of Italo Calvino’s novel Invisible Cities, a collection of what I like to consider prose poems about Marco Polo and his travels to the many different cities he’s visited.  These cities are being told to Kubla Khan but in turn are really being told to the reader and Matthew’s poem whether he read that book or not is a reflection of it.  The one thing I liked about Invisible Cities is the growth of the absurd and strange concepts for each city.  They become contradictions and Matthews first line, “I’m invited I say, though no one believes me.” and continues to state, “None of the names are names.  None of the walls are walls.”  I’ll let you read the rest of it on our site but these contradictions throughout the pieces really sets up the reader nicely on what they should and shouldn’t expect….

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