Tag Archives: Idiom Magazine

The New Interactive Idiom….

So The Idiom Magazine is beginning to take some steps towards its online ‘Interactiveness’….but what does that mean?

That means when you download the PDF of the Current Issue of The Idiom there will be links embedded in the issue that lead the reader to some extras about the pieces like:

  • videos or audio of the writers reading there work
  • videos or audio of the writers taking about their work and the process of them writing it or where it came from
  • links to websites that add to the experience when reading the poem
  • links to authors pages and more information about them
  • videos and audio from The Idiom Editors and what they think about the poems and why they accepted it

Right now we have video responses from Brennan Burnside and Claudia Mathos in the Current Issue so check that out and we’ll have some more additions next week!

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New Year, New Book, New Idiom, New Look….

2013 was great for The Idiom Magazine and Piscataway House Publications….we handed out mags at festivals….one of our publishers received their MFA and another publisher worked endlessly at their manuscript….We published our first novel, Tollbooth, and it won the best book of 2013 by the people at Drunk Monkeys!

Our latest issue of The Idiom Magazine has been revamped and all prettied up after we upgraded our printing system…we now have a hard card stock cover and color insides!

Our website http://www.theidiommag.com is going to have a new look in a few weeks and we plan on changing our submissions guidelines so our online issue is a lil more interactive with the internets…check out the site now though for some of our upcoming events going on….

Speaking of upcoming events!  January 18th the release of our next duel book with Idiom Publisher, Keith Baird and editor for some PHP projects, Andrew “Ink” Feindt….it’s gonna be a great show hosted by Chris Rockwell and musician guests Jimmy James from Little Big Toe and Sarah Donner!  There will be coffee drunk from the Revolutionary Lounge Bar with great food as always and throughout the night poems from the poets and a Haiku Death Match to the DEATH!  It’s free to get in and books will be for sale for $8 and if ya have a book idea perhaps bring it by and maybe you can be having the next book release party!

Over the next two weeks I will be posting my favorite poems from the book and some selections from the current issue of The Idiom so keep an eye out for these posts…..and don’t forget to send us some pieces for possible publication…..

I’ll start with the poems in the current issue from Keith Baird and Ink….

Keith Baird’s poems use simple images to talk about the big picture….how can velcro, rocks we stand on, or the colors we look at really explain anything….Keith shows us that they do more work for us then we could ever imagine…

untitled

with all these
vibrant colors before us
it’s easy to forget
that we’re only
staring at the
smallest
spectrum
waves.

untitled

We’re cutting our hands and feet
On sand and rock,
But give it enough heat
And we’ll be sliding on smooth glass.

untitled

Like velcro, quietly fitting together,
Tiny hairs and tendrils attaching
Softly to each other,
And making such a racket when
Separating.

I love when poets use math in poems….and Ink’s poem includes math and some microeconomics to express the logical mindset that any independent artist would like to express…

Poetry Appraisal

By the transitive property
and creative accounting,
each book of poetry should be valued
in the thousands of dollars.

The proof:
If 1 picture = 1,000 words
and 1 poem = 1 picture,
keeping in mind that even mediocre art
sells for around $300
and that there are generally 50 poems
hanging between front and back cover frames,
then 50 x $300 = $1,500.

But poets are kind.
They know there is more to life than money,
that their art requires time to appreciate
and is not inherently decorative.
So their union issues deep discounts –
coupon code: time=money,
bringing books down to a paltry $5 to $15.

And yet you still debate the purchase.

It’s A Wonderful Flashback Friday with The Idiom!

On December 20th in 1946 the film It’s A Wonderful Life first appeared in theaters in New York City.  Here is a still from one of the earlier takes when George Bailey is looking through the book that Clarence was reading…. it was actually supposed to be a current issue of The Idiom Magazine.

It's A Wonderful Idiom Life

It’s A Wonderful Idiom Life

Do you know what book they actually replaced the idiom with in the movie?  Comment below and I’ll pick a random winner to receive our Idiom special prize holiday package….

Pass this post around to others and spread some words….

 

Joshua Ballard’s Epic Return to the Universe….

In this current issue of The Idiom Joshua Ballard makes his epic return since publishing a collection of his poetry with Piscataway House Publications (i keep going)

In fact heres a link to a video from his book release party when it was released…

His poem The Science of Stars addresses that existential feeling we all get when looking at a city in the distance or the night sky and those heavy thoughts we have questioning our own existence to our everyday activities….

Science tells us that the universe is expanding
that never again will it be quite like this
never again will the stars be gazing upon lovers
at this exact angle
how perfect this moment is, then
that there are a billion stars for every human
that has ever existed on this planet
how that’s the most humbling thing I can think of
and those tiny flecks in the sky are the closest thing
to a connection with the universe we’re ever going to have
I’m gonna call Josh an experience poet….a writer who’s really good at writing about that moment of enjoyment, excitement, or anguish and able to take all the feelings of an experience and putting it into words…check out the rest of his piece on our site and you can see Josh read at many poetry events around Jersey…

Josh is very involved with the local community and is starting a non-profit organization which will put on events and other awesome shows…check out the Artist For Change Facebook Page

What is Fecundity….

In the current issue of the Idiom there is a poem by Susie Garay called Fecundity….Never heard that word before so I googled it…wikipedia told me it’s “derived from the word fecund, generally refers to the ability to reproduce


Fecundity

I wonder about the
fecundity of a thing.

The birthing of ideas,
the act itself.

The miracle of thought
that leads to action.
The dreaming that
brings things to pass.

Living on
this planet
is messy.
And I am often
a mess.

But from the mess
come morsels
that I never would
have come upon
otherwise.

The writing today
was interesting.

Such odd old memories
coming to the surface.
I hope they serve
their purpose,
then go.

Susie though is not talking about the physical act of giving birth but “the birthing of ideas, / the act itself” and I especially like the idea of ‘morsels’ of thoughts coming out of the ‘mess’ in her life and “such odd old memories / coming to the surface.”

She ends her poem elegantly as some of the friends of The Idiom who have come and gone “I hope they serve / their purpose, / then go.” That line break ending on serve does double the work as it continues the thought but implies the work that the ideas are doing…

Also coming out on Thanksgiving Day a new video on our Youtube Page!  A video showing all the fun you can have with this issues interactive cover….

RIP Geoffrey Chaucer and Flashback Friday is back!

Geoffrey Chaucer died on October 25th 1400….he’s known as the father of English Literature and the Canterbury Tales was one of the first pieces of literature that kick-started a passion in the written word for The Idiom.

Reading the Canterbury Tales in high school and especially the Miller’s Tale with the big ending scene of Absolon asking for a kiss from Alisoun and she, sticking her arse out the window, made me realize that we’re all a little bit messed up and enjoy a good dirty story no matter what century we are in….

Here’s a picture of Chaucer with his copy of Tollbooth published by Piscataway House Publications obviously a major influence on many of his works and must have been proud of such characters as Sarah, Kid with Clownhead, and Jimmy Saare….

Chaucer and the Idiom

Chaucer about to relax with our novel Tollbooth

Like this picture?  Comment about it and share it with your friends!

Imaginary Buildings in Invisible Cities perhaps?

In the Current Issue of The Idiom Magazine Matthew Antonio has a poem called Imaginary Buildings 2…He had a few other Imaginary Building poems and other numbered poems in a series titled He….unfortunately they were published in other places so I grabbed #2 before I could lose it.

I love these types of poems and if you know my (Mark Brunetti) poetry you know that I have a small collection of poems I have dubbed ‘museum’ poems.  My obsession with museum poems began with Carolyn Forche’s poem The Museum of Stones.   I was given a workshop prompt and wrote The Museum of Dogs which won me the William Paterson Poetry prize and eventually became the title for my collection of poems for my thesis project.

….but back to Matthew’s poem…..Imaginary Buildings remind me of Italo Calvino’s novel Invisible Cities, a collection of what I like to consider prose poems about Marco Polo and his travels to the many different cities he’s visited.  These cities are being told to Kubla Khan but in turn are really being told to the reader and Matthew’s poem whether he read that book or not is a reflection of it.  The one thing I liked about Invisible Cities is the growth of the absurd and strange concepts for each city.  They become contradictions and Matthews first line, “I’m invited I say, though no one believes me.” and continues to state, “None of the names are names.  None of the walls are walls.”  I’ll let you read the rest of it on our site but these contradictions throughout the pieces really sets up the reader nicely on what they should and shouldn’t expect….