Tag Archives: Idiom

Ink’s video about his poem in the Current Issue…..

This Interactivity of The Idiom’s issues is going great!

This week we have a video by Andrew “Ink” Feindt for his untitled poem in the Current Issue.

You can get to it by the linked panel in the The Idiom Magazine section at the top of the page
or download the PDF file of the current issue and find Ink’s poem and the hyperlinks at the bottom which will bring you to his video.

Orrr….what the Hell, I’ll make it super easy and just put Ink’s link right here

Stay tuned in the upcoming weeks for a video of Keith Baird and his poem and some more to come before we start making the May Issue which will be released at Live Stock!

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Bone Dancers Drink….

Bone Dancers Drink   is the first and last line in Jeffrey Grassley’s poem Seen from the Current Issue of The Idiom Magazine

the rest of the piece has just as many great one liners and images throughout and reads really well out loud.  It’s a great homage to Bukowski and his attitude that writers shouldn’t try to write like him is something I wish more writers would learn.  “And too often we multiply ourselves / by our tragedies” is a great statement and a thought I’ve been contemplating about myself and the people around me….

Being Able to Touch is a tighter poem but flows just as easily as the last one.

“teacher

of cadence, an education
in bad prophecy– project
and convince them, that yes,
i speak of, electricity
static-cling shockwaves on skin
beneath warming sheets
and little space– ghost stories,
we told too many war stories,”

His internal rhymes are magnificent without being obvious or sing-songy.  Again his images surprise me as I approach each line and although I can’t make an immediate connection to them by the end of the poem I am satisfied.

Here’s his bio that he sent me and you should check out his chapbook if ya like his stuff:

-Jeffrey Graessley lives in La Puente, CA. His poems can be found in the upcoming volumes of Emerge Literary Journal and RCC MUSE Magazine. His first chapbook, Her Blue Dress is due out sometime in September (Silver Birch Press, 2013). His recent discovery of the BEAT generation has prompted loving and longing thoughts for that simple, drunken, far-gone time in American history.

James Duncan and his use of the absurd….

You can see James Duncan’s poems in the current issue. I couldn’t link it from my ipad so here’s the address:
http://theidiommag.com/idiom%20sites/idiommagazine.html

I like when things don’t make sense. I especially like when people get angry about things that don’t make sense. In James Duncan’s poem No Sunday Delivery we have a narrator who’s mad cause someone stole his mailbox….but the anger seems unwarranted if this is taking place on a Sunday when things don’t get delivered anyways….

I like how everything seems to reference every other image in the piece….the birds in flight connect with the crying babies because I think of a stork who delivers babies and the stamps for sunlight remind me of a fresh begging and of course the play on the word stamps as a verb and the currency we use to mail things….I’m not quite sure what this piece is about but having everything reference each other and a few unstable spacings around the piece give me some kind of poetic pleasure….

James’s other poem in the issue, Waiting for the Artist to Arrive Is a little more concrete and narrative. It’s a kind of ars poetica and celebrates the similarities of hanging out in Astoria and an Edward Hopper scene of people doing there daily routine and sometimes that quick glimpse into a brief moment of someone’s life.

I don’t know Manhattan well enough (does anyone really?) to know if they would actually line around the block “to catch a glimpse at that thousand word painting of checkerboard broken windows” but considering the state of reality television today he may not be too far off…

Ryan Swofford’s poem in the current issue

Although we began handing out the nextissue of The Idiom at the New York Poetry Festival, I’m gonna finish up this week on the blog with some poems from the last issue…
 
I relate to Ryan’s poem, <em>Expectations</em> in <a href=”http://theidiommag.com/idiommagazine.html”>the current issue</a> because I myself am a student…and sometimes as a student I felt like I was faking it or playing the role and “had to/ get one B/ I had to because I didn’t want to/ seem like I was trying to hard”
 
His first stanza really sets the scene with great line breaks for the narrator and all too…
 
“An honor student
would never get so much shit
as me, so long as he
kept his grades up
combed his hair
tucked in his shirt, and firmly!
FIRMLY!
shook hands with his boss
or his teacher, handing him
an award
(oh, would you look at that?
four-point-oh, what a beauty!)”

In remembrance of Rod

Unfortunately, the Idiom is in the middle of moving and we don’t have a new Flashback Friday for you….here are our past ones so you can catch up!

Also it has been 38 years since the death of Rod Serling a personal hero and influence on the idiom…new years wouldn’t be the same without the twilight zone marathon….here is a past idiom cover that has different characters of the show drawn by idiom poet, Nicole Greenwood:

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Aleathia reading her poem Inherent Topography….

If there’s anything I’ve learned from the Dodge Poets and poetry event’s I attend it’s that sometimes you can get more from a poem without reading it and hearing it be read out loud to you….

So I won’t be posting the poem in this draft (of course you can always find it in the current issue)

but here is the link to an audio file of Aleathia reading her piece

 

  • We liked the lines about “the heart that can’t control its destination of its beats” and the “sleeping back rise and fall like overthrown countries in turmoil”. There’s a certain flow to this poem that exists when she reads it out loud and if you are looking at the piece you see how that works with her stanzas and line breaks. All the stanzas are 4 lines each except for the first one which has an additional line which draws focus to the title of the piece within the poem.
  • The shorter lines at the end help create a conclusion for the poem and gives an additional sense of isolation from the short 2 word lines unlike the rest of the piece which is more concrete and descriptive. Even the last three images we are given, the pen stopping, the books toppling, the trucks racing prepare us for the lonely ending.
  • The contradiction of asking an uncle in prison for a soft hand is unpredictable, but fitting for the next line talking about “misguided morality”.

 

and don’t forget tomorrow is Flashback Friday where we will be celebrating Flag Day and Maurice Sendak’s Birthday with an original picture from Where the Wild Things Are that featured an Idiom flag….

The idiom website….

There’s so much going on with The Idiom Website and blog, I thought I’d use this post to let you know about it all: